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Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels

Today I find myself turning 50.

My first reaction to this is “thank God I finished Issue 36 before this happened” because, as unreasonable and irrational as it may sound, I’m pretty sure that if I hadn’t been able to do there would be some psychic damage. As it is, the only psychic damage I’ve suffered so far is that when we checked the mail this morning we discovered that the American Association of Retired Persons had mailed me membership card.

The weirdest thing about turning 50 is that it means I’ve been doing internet-focused entertainment things for half my life. I started Help Desk in 1996, when I was 25. I stopped doing Help Desk when I turned 45, but I’d started writing web serials at 40, and I’m still doing that. (Even in the two and a half years of struggling through Issue 36, I was still working on web serials. I was just working

verrrrryyyyyyyyyyyy

sloooooooooowwwwwwlllllllyyyyyyyy…)

So as of today, for half my life I’ve been an Internet Busker.

11 comments

  1. Happy birthday, old timer!
    Congrats on 2.5 decades of internet shenanigans.

  2. That’s 91.25 Scaramucci’s!

    … wait, that’s wrong and my math is bad.

    A Scaramucci is 10 days. 25 years is 9,125 days. So 25 years is 912.5 Scaramucci’s.

    STUPID DECIMALS

  3. you lost me … Scaramucci lasted 11 days in office according to Wikipedia, and the average year has 365.25 days so … I am assuming that you are, or have been, celebrating Independence Day and your birthday (many happy returns) and may be innumerate for two or three more.
    Don’t they got calculators in your neck of the woods?

  4. Well… when news of his departure first hit the press they all reported his tenure as lasting 10 days. He posted some article claiming that actually, it was 11, but I don’t know that anyone backed him up on it at the time, and he strikes me as the kind of guy who would police his own wikipedia page, so… 🙂

  5. Wow, AARP waited until you were 50 before mailing you a membership offer? I started getting them when I was 40 (decimal).

  6. AARP *really* jumped the gun with me. I was 29 or 30 (yes, base 10) when they sent me my first application for membership. It was funny enough that I kept it. A few months later, one of the tech managers in my department was about to turn 30. With the assistance of the department clerk (lovely lady!) who provided appropriate address labels, I sent him the application via company mail, timed to arrive on his birthday. His office was close enough to mine that I heard his consternation when he opened it. #evilgrin

  7. I was killed August 31 2001 (I got better) so this has been going on 5 years (more or less) longer than I’ve been dead, but the ratios are converging.

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