Curveball Year Two: That Which Does Not Dream, Available Now

Submitted by Christopher Wright on

Curveball Year Two: That Which Does Not Dream is now available for purchase on, Kobo, Google Play, iBooks, Page Foundry/Inktera, and Scribd in eBook format. It should also be available in the Barnes & Noble online store soon.

If paperbacks are more your thing, the Curveball Year Two trade paperback is also immediately available on the CreateSpace and Amazon online stores. It may start showing up in other places eventually, but that tends to take longer. Anyone who purchases the trade paperback on Amazon also gets the Kindle version free through Amazon's Kindle Matchbook program.

Trade Paperback is $14.50, eBook is $3.99.

But that's not all!

Pay Me, Bug! is in the Immerse-Or-Die StoryBundle

Submitted by Christopher Wright on

Update: The ImmerseOrDie bundle is now live!

The 15th of April is a day of woe and suffering here in the United States. That's our deadline for filing Federal Income Taxes, you see, and that's when a lot of us watch sadly as we stuff envelopes full of money and watch that money fly away, never to return. It's a time of change: specifically, a time when change is really all we have left, jingling uselessly in our pockets.

It's a perfect time for a StoryBundle. And if you're going to buy a StoryBundle, why not buy one with Pay Me, Bug! in it?

On April 15, StoryBundle will launch a new collection of eight indie Fantasy and Science Fiction titles. It's the ImmerseOrDie StoryBundle, eight books (including mine) that passed the ImmerseOrDie Report.

Patreon: Because November Isn't Busy Enough

Submitted by Christopher Wright on

Things I did yesterday:

Why would I even think of doing this in November, you ask? Because when I make poor decisions, I make them enthusiastically.

An Apology to Self-Publishers: #HaleNo, #bloggerblackout, and Sloppy Comparisons

Submitted by Christopher Wright on

About a week ago an author named Kathleen Hale wrote an article in the Guardian about how she reacted to a bad review by an anonymous book reviewer by trying to track down the reviewer in real life. It was stalking, plain and simple: there’s no other way to describe it, and there’s no reason it should be described any other way.