Curveball

Superheroes are real. Someone wants to kill them all.

Liberty, America's first and most famous superhero, has been murdered. As most of the nation mourns, a few wonder if there's more to the story than people are being told. Heroes and villains come together to learn the truth behind the crime, and uncover a conspiracy much larger -- and more deadly -- than they expected.

What is Project Recall?

Start from the beginning

A Rake by Starlight

Politics is dirty. Piracy is just a little smudged.

Grif Vindh, Captain of the Fool's Errand, has a problem: he just stumbled across the single most dangerous thing in his part of the galaxy. It isn't a thing he would have looked for, if he'd known about it, but since he has it he figures he might as well try to sell it.

The problem is, it's not the kind of thing you can sell without taking a side... and taking sides makes you a walking target for all the other sides you didn't take.

Start from the beginning.

Pay Me, Bug!

Never bet against your Captain.

Grif Vindh, Captain of the Fool's Errand, just pulled off the job of a lifetime... but with great success comes unwanted attention. The government he stole from wants to find out how, and they've sent one of their best to track him down. A second government wants him to do it again, and they're willing to blackmail him to do it.

Start from the beginning.

The Abyss Gazes Back: Part Three

Submitted by C B Wright on
South Bronx, Morrisania

Special Agent Philip Henry has a reputation for coolness under fire. This reputation has sometimes been described in semi-flattering terms, like when one of his superiors compared him to Joe Friday from the old Dragnet radio programs. Sometimes the description is less flattering, like when one of his colleagues accused him of being a soulless, cold-hearted son of a bitch.

At the moment his reputation is being tested. As Sergeant Alishia Webb glowers at him from across the table of the sole booth in Elliot’s Diner, he fights back the urge to flinch away from her gaze.

The Abyss Gazes Back: Part Two

Submitted by C B Wright on
Reunion

The silver-shrouded man hangs in the air, suspended by a power that existed before time.

Granite walls and floors gleam dully in the soft light filling the otherwise empty room. The light doesn’t come from the room, but from the power: the circle that surrounds him, the symbols inscribed within the circle, all glowing with enough strength to reach the very end of the long room, to reveal the door—plain, almost shabby compared to the room—that sits, closed, at the far end.

What is this place? How did I get here?

The Abyss Gazes Back: Part One

Submitted by C B Wright on
Nautilus Conference Room

“OK,” CB says, leaning forward over the table to glower at Robert. “Please tell me this is some kind of sick joke.”

They’re all sitting in a conference room at the Nautilus’ stern. The bulkheads are a latticework of steel polymer and a transparent sheet of something significantly stronger than glass. At the moment, the windows (portholes? CB isn’t sure what to call them) show nothing but solid darkness—they’re too deep for light from the surface to filter through, and they’re not running with external lights at the moment—so the only light in the room comes from fixtures in the ceiling. The interior lighting combined with the near absolute darkness of the water outside serves to turn windows into mirrors, reflecting the interior of the room from nearly every angle. CB finds it disconcerting.

A Rake by Starlight - Chapter 24

Submitted by C B Wright on
WHEREIN A Lack of Good Options Makes A Bad One Look Better

“What exactly is going on out there?”

It was the seventh or eighth time Morgan had asked the question. In that space of time, he’d moved from irritation, to anger, to confusion, and had finally settled comfortably into a state of utter bewilderment. Grif couldn’t blame him. The repetition was starting to wear thin, but it was a legitimate one to ask. Station Authority wasn’t making any sense.

“No clue, Morgan. The best I can come up with is ‘general bureaucratic incompetence,’ but I’m pretty sure that’s not what’s going on.”

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