The Death and Rebirth of The Points Between

Submitted by C B Wright on

Once upon a time I was happily writing a serial called The Points Between. It was a story I was incredibly passionate about telling -- a story that was viscerally important to me, even though it was way out of my comfort zone and far, far above my level of expertise -- and I'd actually finished an entire arc, and had started on the second arc, when a bunch of inconvenient things happened. The result of these inconvenient things was that the story has remained dormant for years: not dead, because it's never a story I've given up on, but dormant. I needed to make some decisions, and I didn't know what decisions I wanted to make.

I've made those decisions, and am in the process of moving forward. This is the story of that interminable process, and what came out of it.

The Points Between is, in my head, a story with three arcs. The first arc, where Matthew discovered he was a magician, was finished. The second arc, where he had to discover what that meant, was getting started. The third arc, where he had to choose how to use what he knew, was being set up. I was generally pleased with most of what I'd written, but there were a few things I'd done that had bothered me:

Whom The Gods Would Destroy, They First Give Computers

Submitted by C B Wright on

There are a lot of reasons why a computer will die on you, and I think I may have experienced most of them. The truly frustrating thing about it—for me, anyway—is that so many of those reasons look exactly the same at the beginning. A hard drive dying can screw up applications the same way that bad ram can screw up applications the same way that a cracked motherboard can screw up applications the same way that a bad video card can screw up applications. When you take the time to troubleshoot the problem, you can with time and effort figure out which problem it is—either by swapping out components until it starts working again, thus winnowing out the bad component (“aha! Everything started working when I removed Windows!”) or by running a very fancy program that tests everything for you, and three days later tells you the problem is expensive.

Yes, those are your only two choices. All the other possibilities are variations of those two choices.

Great Review of Pay Me, Bug! at The Review Hart

Submitted by C B Wright on

The Review Hart is an indie book review blog. I'd submitted Pay Me, Bug! for a review a while back, and I've been a bit nervous about it ever since: The Review Hart, you see, is a site that doesn't pull punches. It's not a mean-spirited site by any means, but if the reviewers (Shen Hart and Michael Keenan) don't like what they're reading they'll tell you exactly what they don't like and why they don't like it.

Today The Review Hart reviewed Pay Me, Bug!:

This is a book for people who enjoy light-hearted sci-fi where classic characters are given a fresh twist. The range of characters is familiar, yet the author brought them to life and made them entirely his own. The races that were represented within the finely woven world were clearly given a lot of thought and are different to the stock that has come to be expected. The plot is well-paced, and the author makes the most of the world and characters to bring about interesting twists and multiple facets that lead to a very enjoyable read. All in all, this is a book that many sci-fi fans will love.

(There's more to the review here.)

I'll take two, thanks!

Patreon: Because November Isn't Busy Enough

Submitted by C B Wright on

Things I did yesterday:

Why would I even think of doing this in November, you ask? Because when I make poor decisions, I make them enthusiastically.

The Ghosts of NaNoWriMos Past

Submitted by C B Wright on

NaNoWriMo is coming, and once again I am on board. I've been doing it since 2003, and while I was sorely tempted to give it a pass this year (because I have a lot on my plate) I realized, as the time grew nearer, that I just couldn't.

Why couldn't I? Because it's part of my workflow.

November is the month where I try to work through a story to see how it goes. I mean, I don't do this exclusively in November—I write all year round, and sometimes I just start writing something to see what I think of it—but what makes NaNoWriMo useful, for me, is the 30 day, 50K word goal. It forces me to keep working on an idea even after I get tired of it, to see if I can get excited about it again. November is the month when I fall in love with a story, all out of love with the story, fall back in love with the story, and at the end of it all I try to assess our relationship to see if it's worth continuing.

This will be my twelfth year. In the last eleven years I won seven times, but some of my losses were more useful—were, in the end, better relationships—than some of my wins. NaNoWriMo doesn't run on fairy magic—your content doesn't turn into a pumpkin when the clock strikes 12 midnight on November 30. Wins are nice, but stories are better.

With that in mind, let me show you a decade's worth of workflow:

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