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First Do No Harm: Part Four

Submitted by Christopher Wright on
Curveball, by Christopher B. Wright
Conflict Resolution

The elevator door dings a second time. CB and Jenny hear the doors slide open as heavy-booted feet stomp out into the cube farm.

CB lights his cigarette.

“You’re going to smoke now?” Jenny stares at him incredulously.

“Yep,” CB says. “It’s kind of a thing.” He closes his eyes and concentrates. He feels the world spinning around him.

First Do No Harm: Part Three

Submitted by Christopher Wright on
Curveball, by Christopher B. Wright
TriHealth, 2AM

The one thing they aren’t doing is wearing all black.

CB is wearing his trench coat, old blue jeans, his favorite boots and a black Minor Threat t-shirt that’s unraveling around the collar. Jenny is wearing dark blue slacks, a button-up shirt, tennis shoes, and a light windbreaker with large inside pockets. They don’t look like cat burglars. This is important, CB explains, because people who dress like cat burglars tend to get picked up by the police on the grounds that they look like they’re about to steal something.

First Do No Harm: Part Two

Submitted by Christopher Wright on
Curveball, by Christopher B. Wright
Elmuth Shipping

It’s early evening, but not yet dark, when he finally reaches the Elmuth Shipping compound. CB wonders if it’ll be as heavily guarded as TriHealth. It isn’t. It has security, but prowling around the fence he doesn’t see anything out of the ordinary: chain link fence, barbed wire on top, bored blue-shirts not paying a lot of attention to their jobs. The fence is in lousy condition, and there’s a section on one side that’s come loose from it’s moorings. It’s trivial to crawl through.

That’s the problem with conspiracies. You just can’t rely on your contractors to hold up their end of things.

First Do No Harm: Part One

Submitted by Christopher Wright on
Curveball, by Christopher B. Wright
TriHealth, Uptown

There’s one TriHealth building in Farraday City. It’s uptown, which means it doesn’t cater to riffraff. It also makes the organization look shadier than it already did. Large companies don’t stay large by being naive, and a company that opens an office in Farraday Uptown is doing so because of the advantages the location brings. Some of those advantages look good on a ledger. Other “advantages” never show up on a ledger, or on any official documentation for that matter. Those advantages come with certain expectations that are plainly, and occasionally painfully, communicated.

It’s not impossible to find an honest company in Farraday City. The downtown business district is full of them—well, it’s full of businesses who are willing to pretend they don’t know who runs the city because they want the tax breaks, but aren’t particularly eager to break the law themselves. That’s about as honest as it gets in the city. But uptown—uptown business zoning is reserved for preferred partners.

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